Showing posts with label stitch - tutorial. Show all posts
Showing posts with label stitch - tutorial. Show all posts

This variation of the blanket stitch is useful for creating loops and for adding texture to dimensional embroidery. it is worked from one side to another on a foundation made up of straight stitches. The blanket stitches do not got through the fabric.

1) Bring the thread to the front of the fabric in A. Take the needle to the side at B. Pull the thread through to form a straight stitch.


2) Repeat step 1 to build a double-threaded foundation stitch that will support the weight of the blanket stitches.



3) Bring the needle to the front just under A. Pull the thread.


4) Take the needle from top to bottom behind the foundation stitches. Do not go through the fabric.


5) Position the thread under the tip of the needle and begin pulling the thread through.


6) Continue pulling the thread towards you until the stitch is wrapped snuggly around the foundation stitches.



7) Repeat steps 4-6 until the foundation stitches are completely covered.


8) To secure the final blanket stitch, take the needle to the back of the fabric in B. Pull the thread and secure it at the back of the fabric.




The herringbone stitch belongs to this type of stitches that are very versatile. The tutorial to the simple herringbone stitch is available on the blog.

herringbone stitch


There is such an incredible number of different variations of this stitch that it would impossible for me to list them all on my blog. Here is a sample of the most common :

1) tagged herringbone stitch


2) tacked herringbone stitch


3) double and tacked herringbone stitch


4) threaded herringbone stitch







5) looped herringbone stitch


Other variations of the stitch are available on Pumora or Sarah's Hand Embroidery Tutorials. For examples of herringbone stitches embroidered on curved lines, see this French blog J'en rêvais; and laced herringbone stitch, see Coeur de freesia. Both sites are in French, my images are self-explanatory.
As the name clearly suggests, the double herringbone stitch is made up of two rows of herringbone stitches. A second row (in red on the pictures) using the same spacing is worked over the first (in blue on the pictures), interlacing the stitches together.



The herringbone stitch is often used to work decorative borders. To make your work easier and help make stitches evenly, mark two parallel lines. Space the stitches closer or wider apart according to the desired effect.

Picture of a completed herringbone stitch
This darning stitch, also called the Queen Anne stitch, is created from a combination of two types of parallel stitches: the vertical straight stitches form the framework; the horizontal stitches are woven through that framework. 

Bring the needle to the front of the fabric, just to the side of the last vertical stitch and very close to the top of it.

Woven filling stitch


Weave the needle over the last vertical stitch and under the stitch next to it. 

Woven filling stitch


Continue weaving over and under the stitches.



Woven filling stitch

Take the needle to the back of the fabric to the back of the fabric, just to the left of the first vertical stitch and level with the line of weaving. 

Woven filling stitch


Pull the thread through. 

Woven filling stitch


Bring the needle to the front. Pull the thread through. Weave to the other side - over, under, over, under, etc.

Woven filling stitch


Take the needle to the back of the fabric. Use the tip of the needle to re-ajust and tighten the threads together.  

Woven filling stitch


Pull the thread through and re-emerge just below this point. Continue weaving from side to side until the vertical stitches are completely covered.

Woven filling stitch

Woven filling stitch - View from the front of the fabric
View from the front of the fabric

Woven filling stitch - View from the back of the fabric
View from the back of the fabric
Also known as stroke stitch or flat stitch, the straight stitch is one of the most - if not THE most - basic embroidery stitch, as it is made without crossing or looping the thread. 

Bring the thread to the front in A.


Take the needle to the back in B.


Pull the thread through and bring to the front in C, etc.


The straight stitch can be stitched in any direction and to any length, and forms the basis for many other stitches. Here it is stitched horizontally.


This stitch is used to form broken or unbroken lines or starbursts, fill shapes, and create geometric designs.
Arrowhead stitches are worked as filling stitches in counted thread and surface embroidery. They are made by using two straight stitches oriented at a certain angle to each other. Here the stitch is worked on vertical lines.*

For this excercise, I count in '5': five spaces between each penciled lines, and fives holes down between points 1 and 2. This way, I'm sure my arrowhead stitch isn't wonky.


1. Bring the thread in front in 1. Insert the needle in 2 and re-emerge in 3.


2. Pull the thread through to form the first half of the arrow stitch.


3.  Take the needle at the back of 2 and re-emerge in 4 
(NOTE: points 4 and 2 are positioned on the same line. They shoudn't be above or below each other).


4. Pull the the thread to complete the first arrowhead stitch. The thread is in position to start the second arrow.


5. Repeat the stages until you reach the desired length.




*TIP - If you can't visualise the weave of the fabric, mark three lines with a pencil to help position the stitches accurately.