Le Stitch, Mr B. and the p'tit Bout went to visit Bruges, Belgium, last weekend. In-between beer and chips breaks, we managed to stroll around the beautiful city that has been made famous in the world for its delicate hand-made lace crochet.


This traditional art originated in the 16th century. It was passed from mother to daughter and was taught orally. The delicacy of the lace crochet grew in popularity and contributed to increase the wealth of the city.

Here is an incredible Youtube video showing you a lace-maker in action.  The speed is absolutely mind-blowing !!



You will find more details on the Kent Centrum website (the official museum of lace crocher in Bruges).

I warmly recommend that you visit the city. It is stunning despite the truck load of tourists coming round the clock and the Flemish welcome is not that warm.



I have recently hooked a basket for my ever-growing stash of wool, and wanted to share this tutorial with you.

Material :
- t-shirt yarn
- crochet hook (size 10 to 14, up to 15 according to the size of the yarn)
- stitch markers


I have bought the yarn from a Portuguese maker : Tek Tek, as I always to stay away from the big brand names. Besides the yarn is much nicer and also way cheaper :) 

The wooden hook was bought from Adzewoodcraft (Etsy). It's been made just for me, and it sure is a hook that is special to my heart.


After more than 8 failed attempt, I can honestly say that if your base is wonky, it means your tension is way too tight. 


I have found that Donna Wolfe's instructions and youtube videos were really helpful. 



The only changes I have made were:
- adding handles on the side.
- having a variations of stitches on the side from single to half-treble stitches. I have also stitched my singles on the outside to prevent the baskets to become a giant floppy frisbee. 


Note- Do not expect the basket to hold by itself. If it's not full with stuff inside, it will collapse as t.shirt yarn is flexible and elastic.


CLEARANCE - Only one 50g skein of dk sustainable merino wool.

£4.50 the skein. That's £2 off the usual price. 

To benefit from the 10% discount (excl. postage), email me directly (contact.lestitch@gmail.com).
Organic, extrafine, soft 100% merino yarn hand-dyed using non-toxic dyes. Variegated colour (cyan more greenish than blueish, purple going towards dark old pink). Perfect for kid or baby garments as the wool does not sting.



DK weight - A 50gm hank provides about 115m (125 yards) of yarn

Recommended needle size:
4 - 5mm (UK)
4 - 7mm (US)

Washing instructions:
Hand wash only at 40 degrees max. Use a mild detergent.
Reshape garments whilst damp. Dry flat.

Sustainable type of wool, meaning that the farms must ensure animals are well kept (e.g. no mulesing system) and the farming methods help protect the environment in the best possible manners.




PRIMAVERA
(spring)

These are the colours of spring. The colours of the flowers that pop out of the grass: the dandelions, daisies, blue bells... It is all this season spirit that the yarn delicately speckled in yellow and blueish purple tries to embody.

£6.50 per skein.



To benefit from the 10% discount (excl. postage), email me directly (contact.lestitch@gmail.com).

Organic, extrafine, soft 100% merino yarn hand-dyed using non-toxic dyes. Speckled colour (natural, yellow, blueish purple). Perfect for garments as the fibre does not sting.

DK weight - A 50gm hank provides about 115m of yarn

Recommended needle size:
4 - 5 mm (UK)
5 - 7 mm (US)

Washing instructions:
Hand wash only at 40 degrees max. Use a mild detergent.
Reshape garments whilst damp. Dry flat.


Sustainable type of wool, meaning that the farms must ensure animals are well kept (e.g. no mulesing system) and the farming methods help protect the environment in the best possible manners.


SEVILLA

Mix of bright yellow and red colours reminiscent of the drizzling hot Spanish city of Sevilla.

£24.99 the lot of 3 skeins.

To benefit from the 10% discount (excl. postage), email me directly (contact.lestitch@gmail.com).

Three small skeins of luxury and soft fine yarn. I first dyed the tops which I then carded and spun smoothly using a wheel. The spun is slightly uneven making it a novelty yarn that surely will be the star of the your yarn basket. The resulting yarn is a fine 2-ply yarn.

Each skein is unique and made from different blends of wool:
- the smallest skein is made from a blend of mohair (red colour) and wool (yellow): 9 metres (9 yards) = 5 grammes
- the mostly yellow skein is made mixing wool and two-threaded cotton: 56 m (61 y) = 16 grammes
- the mostly red skein is made from corriedale wool: 33 m (36 y) = 19 grammes

These would be perfect to use as an accent yarn as they are quite small. The wool is a fine 2-ply type, requiring needles sized 2 or 3mm

Handwash only at room temperature with a mild detergent, otherwise the fibre will felt.

Recently, I have participated in a wool exchange on instagram (#fibershare), which made me discover weaving.

Let me explain.

I dye yarn, and the lot I sent to my wool pal (@sarahelizabethsphere based in Canada) only included wool hand dyed by me.

In my (relatively conventional) mind, I thought she was going to knit or crochet the yarn. Well I was pretty mistaken. Sarah used my wool to weave wall hangings and mobile baby (available in her Etsy shop).

Here are some pictures of her work (my wool is the chunky indigo / dark blue).



For some time, I have seen more and more weaved art on instagram. It seems that there is a new craze for this textile art that comes from the United States of the 1970s. When we see the bobo / hipster mood of the 2010s, it does not come as a surprise that this art has resurfaced.

Personally, I find it amazingly pretty but, having a practical mind and an allergic companion, I imagine the dust that must amalgamate and, just for that, I do not see myself weaving or putting a weaved wall hanging at my house. What about you?