Showing posts with label straight stitch. Show all posts
Showing posts with label straight stitch. Show all posts

This stitch is commonly sewn separate from the main embroidery motif. As its name indicates, the stitch is reminiscent of a wheat sheaf.

First work three straight stitches (tutorial for the straight stitch is available here) ...






... Bring the thread in 7, between the three straight stitch, towards the middle of the second stitch. Do not let the needle go through the straight stitches.



Put the needle behind straight stitch 1on the left ...



...  then under straight stitch 3 on the right.


Pull the thread through in 7 again.


Take the needle to the back of the fabric and secure the stitch.



This variation of the blanket stitch is useful for creating loops and for adding texture to dimensional embroidery. it is worked from one side to another on a foundation made up of straight stitches. The blanket stitches do not got through the fabric.

1) Bring the thread to the front of the fabric in A. Take the needle to the side at B. Pull the thread through to form a straight stitch.


2) Repeat step 1 to build a double-threaded foundation stitch that will support the weight of the blanket stitches.



3) Bring the needle to the front just under A. Pull the thread.


4) Take the needle from top to bottom behind the foundation stitches. Do not go through the fabric.


5) Position the thread under the tip of the needle and begin pulling the thread through.


6) Continue pulling the thread towards you until the stitch is wrapped snuggly around the foundation stitches.



7) Repeat steps 4-6 until the foundation stitches are completely covered.


8) To secure the final blanket stitch, take the needle to the back of the fabric in B. Pull the thread and secure it at the back of the fabric.




This darning stitch, also called the Queen Anne stitch, is created from a combination of two types of parallel stitches: the vertical straight stitches form the framework; the horizontal stitches are woven through that framework. 

Bring the needle to the front of the fabric, just to the side of the last vertical stitch and very close to the top of it.

Woven filling stitch


Weave the needle over the last vertical stitch and under the stitch next to it. 

Woven filling stitch


Continue weaving over and under the stitches.



Woven filling stitch

Take the needle to the back of the fabric to the back of the fabric, just to the left of the first vertical stitch and level with the line of weaving. 

Woven filling stitch


Pull the thread through. 

Woven filling stitch


Bring the needle to the front. Pull the thread through. Weave to the other side - over, under, over, under, etc.

Woven filling stitch


Take the needle to the back of the fabric. Use the tip of the needle to re-ajust and tighten the threads together.  

Woven filling stitch


Pull the thread through and re-emerge just below this point. Continue weaving from side to side until the vertical stitches are completely covered.

Woven filling stitch

Woven filling stitch - View from the front of the fabric
View from the front of the fabric

Woven filling stitch - View from the back of the fabric
View from the back of the fabric
Also known as stroke stitch or flat stitch, the straight stitch is one of the most - if not THE most - basic embroidery stitch, as it is made without crossing or looping the thread. 

Bring the thread to the front in A.


Take the needle to the back in B.


Pull the thread through and bring to the front in C, etc.


The straight stitch can be stitched in any direction and to any length, and forms the basis for many other stitches. Here it is stitched horizontally.


This stitch is used to form broken or unbroken lines or starbursts, fill shapes, and create geometric designs.


A well-balanced amount of French knots (my favourite!), stem and straight stitches creates a beautiful picturesque scenery. I just love it.